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I was recently interviewed by the inimitable Joan Quinn on her show, The Joan Quinn Profiles. She is trying hard to understand what I do and why I’m on her show. I said stuff like “I’m not professionally trained as a musician, but I was in the marching band” and I referred to REDCAT Studio as “A Whitman’s Sampler of Experimental Performance.” Click on the picture to be taken to the website that contains the video (it’s in Flash format)  My interview starts around the 13:30 mark (note: interview ends a bit abruptly.)

This is a picture of John Hogan on the Joan Quinn Profiles.

“I wasn’t professionally trained, but I was in the marching band…”

I’m very excited to report I will be performing “Chair Piece” as part of Studio: Spring 2014 at REDCAT, from Saturday, May 31 2014 to Sunday June 1, 2014.   REDCAT’s Studio series is an ongoing, interdisciplinary program featuring informal new performance works and works-in-progress. This edition of Studio is programmed by guest curators Anna Oxygen and Malcolm Darrell, and offers adventurous audiences a glimpse at projects by emerging Los Angeles artists.

JOHN HOGAN: CHAIR PIECE
In Chair Piece, artist John Hogan cleverly uses Clint Eastwood’s address to the 2012 Republican National Convention as the raw material for a performance satirizing the white American male’s sense of entitlement, eliciting discourse regarding privilege, power dynamics, and the individual’s role within institutions.”

Chair Piece (3 Minute Edit) from thejohnhogan on Vimeo.

 

“You Celebrate Yourselves” serves as the introductory poem in “Song of Yourselves”, a longer performance involving poetry, musical performance, and contextually appropriate audience karaoke. In the live performance, this section ends with an appeal for an audience member to sing karaoke.

From the program for “Song of Yourselves” when it was performed at Automata in Los Angeles, May of 2013: “Welcome to Song of Yourselves, a celebration and laying to rest of the Cultural Supremacy of The American White Male. Tonight, we celebrate his heights, we look at some of his least odious recent low points with affection and humor, and we sing the songs that he wrote and/or adopted during the late twentieth century, when both his power and international influence peaked. We hope you enjoy your evening and are able to laugh, cry, and revel in the twilight of a truly spectacular era in our shared history.”